Welcome to the Demo Society Website

This is the text for a demonstration front page.


The demonstration text goes here. Anyone who knows the login ID can change this text. It's as easy as writing an email.

If you like you can use bullet points like this:

  • Point Number One
  • Point Number Two

Alternatively, you could have a numbered list like this:

  1. The first point
  2. The second point.

The text can be formatted a number of ways. You can write parts in bold to add emphasis. Italics are also available.

You might have a paragraph that you want highlighted.
With one click, it can be displayed like this, with a vertical bar running down the left.

Finally, you can add links. For example, if you have an application form for an event, you can encourage people to download the form.

Here is a document that could be the latest newsletter. It's actually just a sample document. You can upload documents to the website very easily.

Remember: you don't need to be an IT genius to be able to update your website. If you know how to send an email, or perhaps write a letter on your computer, then you have all the skills you need!


Our Next Event is on July 7th 2020

The History of the Bayeux Tapestry


The cloth consists of some fifty scenes with Latin tituli, embroidered on linen with coloured woollen yarns. It is likely that it was commissioned by Bishop Odo, William's half-brother, and made in England—not Bayeux—in the 1070s. In 1729 the hanging was rediscovered by scholars at a time when it was being displayed annually in Bayeux Cathedral. The tapestry is now exhibited at the Musée de la Tapisserie de Bayeux in BayeuxNormandy, France.

The designs on the Bayeux Tapestry are embroidered rather than woven, so that it is not technically a tapestry. Nevertheless, it has always been referred to as a tapestry until recent years when the name 'Bayeux Embroidery' has gained ground among certain art historians. It can be seen as a rare example of secular Romanesque art. Tapestries adorned both churches and wealthy houses in Medieval Western Europe, though at 0.5 by 68.38 metres (1.6 by 224.3 ft, and apparently incomplete) the Bayeux Tapestry is exceptionally large. Only the figures and decoration are embroidered, on a background left plain, which shows the subject very clearly and was necessary to cover large areas.

On 18 January 2018, French President Emmanuel Macron announced that the Bayeux Tapestry would be loaned to Britain for public display. It is expected to be exhibited at the British Museum in London from 2022. It will be the first time that it has left France in 950 years.


Other Future Events

February 1st 2021

Lecture on the Holy Roman Empire

February 3rd 2021

Sanssouci - An Illustrated Talk with Wine

December 12th 2021

Cosimo de' Medici

August 15th 2022

Trip to Ely Cathedral


 The Latest from our Blog

Cosmati Mosaics

April 4th 2019

Fig.1 - Trulli, Puglia, Italy. The Cosmatesque style takes its name from the family of the Cosmati, which flourished in Rome during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries and practiced the art of mosaic. The Cosmati work has this peculiarity, that it is a glass mosaic used in combination with marble. At times it is inlaid on the white marble architraves of doors, on the friezes of cloisters, the flutings of columns, and on sepulchralmonuments. Again, it frames panels, of porphyry or other marbles, on pulpits, episcopal chairs, screens, etc., or is itself used as a panel. The color is brilliant — gold tesserae being freely used. While more frequent in Rome than elsewhere, its use is not confined to that city. Among other places it is found in the Cappella Palatina in